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River Exe In Flood

#1 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 12:41

Apologies for the very poor quality, they were taken on my mobile phone in the rain/drizzle, it wasn't exactly pleasant for taking photos.

River Exe at Tiverton is in 'nearly' full flood. To be exact, it is 6.5ft higher than it's normal level and pictures were taken at the peak. Not quite the level it was at a few weeks ago but enough to flood all the way to Exeter.
4 Fire engines were hard at work last night and into the morning at Cowley Bridge, Exeter where the train tracks were overwhelmed last time. They were erecting a barrier ready for this, not sure if it has worked or not?

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I know it doesn't look like it, but that crest of the rapid is approx 6ft or more high. It's certainly higher than i am.
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Closer view
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Raging torrent, literally
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Near to where the Lowman meets the Exe, this chaps garden is in danger of being flooded
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River Lowman vs River Exe. So those down stream have the whole Lowman raging into the Exe so doubling the flood effect south of Tiverton
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At this point on the Exe, the normal river level is approx 6-7 feet down by the treeline. Infact it wouldn't surprise that at this point, the level is possibly 8ft higher than normal. As it is difficult to get down to the river edge at this point in normal river levels without some kind of ladder.
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#2 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 12:44

Forgot to add, some of the debris going down the Exe (trees) is amazing, some of the trees were atleast 1-2ft in diameter and probably 20ft high or more. When they hit the bridge they make a huge bang and the ground shakes. Sadly, one dead sheep (i think) was seen floating down, my 5yr daughter wasn't pleased.... quite upset to say the least.
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#3 User is offline   Foxy2 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 12:49

Nice Rich. Views of a really necessary flood defense system in Tiverton. Plenty of capacity left to cope with the next batch of heavy rain. River Lowman was in flood but not at previous levels. Still blocked the road from Huntsham to Uplowman.
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#4 User is offline   JOKE_SNOW 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 13:43

Surprisingly sheep are excellent swimmers, the only problem comes from when the floodwaters rise slowly as they're standing in it. For some reason they don't do anything other than stand there and drown but throw a sheep in water and it'll happily swim.
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#5 User is online   Nigel Bolton 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 14:56

View PostJOKE_SNOW, on 22 December 2012 - 13:43, said:

Surprisingly sheep are excellent swimmers, the only problem comes from when the floodwaters rise slowly as they're standing in it. For some reason they don't do anything other than stand there and drown but throw a sheep in water and it'll happily swim.


The Exe and the Barle flow very quickly, as the fall from source to sea is over 1500 feet, most of this fall to the north of Tiverton. It is amazing how much water that river can shift. So far it is not as high as in November, then it reached about a third of the way up the railings in Rich's first picture. Nevertheless, Rich's photos demonstrate very nicely, the power of the river Exe in Tiverton.

Was also much higher still in the Autumn of 2000, when the waters allegedly made it two thirds of the way up the solid concrete walls, some six feet up on present levels. Also, I have not seen the Exe burst its banks on the northern side of town since living here, still has a short way to rise before it does this. Back in 2000, it made its way nearly to the top of the levees which protect the northern side of the town, including, schools and Petroc College.

Interestingly, in the White Ball pub, the building, whose wall can be seen in the foreground on the right hand side of Rich's first picture, has a Nileometer within. This allows one to watch the height of the river change whilst enjoying a beer and not getting wet.

N.
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#6 User is offline   Foxy2 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 15:19

View PostNigel Bolton, on 22 December 2012 - 14:56, said:

The Exe and the Barle flow very quickly, as the fall from source to sea is over 1500 feet, most of this fall to the north of Tiverton. It is amazing how much water that river can shift. So far it is not as high as in November, then it reached about a third of the way up the railings in Rich's first picture. Nevertheless, Rich's photos demonstrate very nicely, the power of the river Exe in Tiverton.

Was also much higher still in the Autumn of 2000, when the waters allegedly made it two thirds of the way up the solid concrete walls, some six feet up on present levels. Also, I have not seen the Exe burst its banks on the northern side of town since living here, still has a short way to rise before it does this. Back in 2000, it made its way nearly to the top of the levees which protect the northern side of the town, including, schools and Petroc College.

Interestingly, in the White Ball pub, the building, whose wall can be seen in the foreground on the right hand side of Rich's first picture, has a Nileometer within. This allows one to watch the height of the river change whilst enjoying a beer and not getting wet.

N.



A nileometer - thats what it is. Nigel -you have enlighyened me. :D
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#7 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 17:55

Just to add, since the pics were taken, the Exe has risen another 6 inches. Exmoor is getting deluged at the moment and so later tonight, both the Lowman and Exe will be even higher.
I suspect by early morning the Exe will be approx 7-8ft higher than usual levels in Tiverton.

Regarding the power, you only had to see the amount of trees floating down there this morning. I've never seen so much debris, it was like someone was up stream with placing them in the water every few minutes.
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#8 User is online   Nigel Bolton 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 18:29

View PostFoxy2, on 22 December 2012 - 15:19, said:

A nileometer - thats what it is. Nigel -you have enlighyened me. :D


Indeed. The Ancient Egyptians used 'Nileometers' to observe the height of the water within the Nile. Once the water level reached a certain height, they then knew it was the correct time to plant their crops, as afterwards the Nile would then flood, bringing water, and also nutrients within, washed downstream by the annual Nile flood. Nileometers can still be seen in and around some of the temples of Ancient Egypt to this day.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nilometer

I am not sure of the history of the 'Nileometer' in the White Ball. However, until recently, there used to be a stone cat (Pussy in the Well), that marked the highest level of the water in the Exe in recent years, that being the Autumn of 2000. However, water levels would have been much higher during the floods of Autumn 1960, when Tiverton was hit by devastating floods.


As to the here and now, Rich makes a salient point of the rain over Exmoor. Being orographically enhanced by strong southwesterly winds, looks like the Barle expecially will capture a great deal of run-off during the next few hours. If the Exe does burst its banks north of Tiverton, will be able to see from our upstairs window tomorrow morning.

N.
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#9 User is offline   Foxy2 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 18:31

View PostNigel Bolton, on 22 December 2012 - 18:29, said:

Indeed. The Ancient Egyptians used 'Nileometers' to observe the height of the water within the Nile. Once the water level reached a certain height, they then knew it was the correct time to plant their crops, as afterwards the Nile would then flood, bringing water, and also nutrients within, washed downstream by the annual Nile flood. Nileometers can still be seen in and around some of the temples of Ancient Egypt to this day.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nilometer

I am not sure of the history of the 'Nileometer' in the White Ball. However, until recently, there used to be a stone cat (Pussy in the Well), that marked the highest level of the water in the Exe in recent years, that being the Autumn of 2000. However, water levels would have been much higher during the floods of Autumn 1960, when Tiverton was hit by devastating floods.


As to the here and now, Rich makes a salient point of the rain over Exmoor. Being orographically enhanced by strong southwesterly winds, looks like the Barle expecially will capture a great deal of run-off during the next few hours. If the Exe does burst its banks north of Tiverton, will be able to see from our upstairs window tomorrow morning.

N.


Saw ther Nileometer on the 'Dark Ages' program on BBC4. Spectacular. Never equated it with the White Ball!
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#10 User is offline   Bazmundo 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 18:33

The Barle is setting records upstream, so the Exe will rise further.

http://www.environme...?stationId=3242

http://www.farsondig...arle/Dulverton/
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#11 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 18:43

The Exe at Exford on Exmoor has a 'very' sharp increase in levels, meaning downstream in an hour or two, Tiverton levels will rise quickly.

The Barle has gone way past the highest recorded limit right now....

This post has been edited by RichC: 22 December 2012 - 18:44

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#12 User is offline   Foxy2 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 19:07

View PostRichC, on 22 December 2012 - 18:43, said:

The Exe at Exford on Exmoor has a 'very' sharp increase in levels, meaning downstream in an hour or two, Tiverton levels will rise quickly.

The Barle has gone way past the highest recorded limit right now....


I wonder how high it went when Lynmouth was Devastated in August 1952 because there were 'Boscastle Type' floods on the Barle through Dulverton on the south side of Exmoor.

http://www.victoriac...ems/1952-floods

This post has been edited by Foxy2: 22 December 2012 - 19:11

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#13 User is online   Nigel Bolton 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:28

View PostNigel Bolton, on 22 December 2012 - 14:56, said:

The Exe and the Barle flow very quickly, as the fall from source to sea is over 1500 feet, most of this fall to the north of Tiverton. It is amazing how much water that river can shift. So far it is not as high as in November, then it reached about a third of the way up the railings in Rich's first picture. Nevertheless, Rich's photos demonstrate very nicely, the power of the river Exe in Tiverton.

Was also much higher still in the Autumn of 2000, when the waters allegedly made it two thirds of the way up the solid concrete walls, some six feet up on present levels. Also, I have not seen the Exe burst its banks on the northern side of town since living here, still has a short way to rise before it does this. Back in 2000, it made its way nearly to the top of the levees which protect the northern side of the town, including, schools and Petroc College.

Interestingly, in the White Ball pub, the building, whose wall can be seen in the foreground on the right hand side of Rich's first picture, has a Nileometer within. This allows one to watch the height of the river change whilst enjoying a beer and not getting wet.

N.


Exe in Tiverton now as high or a wee bit higher than in November. Is now gushing at high speed through those metal railings. Exe has now also burst its banks to the north of Tiverton, and is now beginning to spread out in the fields by Morissons.

Rain in Tiv generally light to mod, but we are presently in the rain shadow of Dartmoor.

N.
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#14 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:37

River Barle has nearly gone off the scale in level... all that water is running into the Exe. Haven't been out tonight to view it.
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#15 User is online   Dave W 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:46

http://www.environme...?stationId=3257

Indeed- remarkably its fully 2ft higher than its ever been in nearly 50 years of records.. and 9ft above its usual level
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#16 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:51

River Exe at Tiverton has not gone down in level for nearly 10hrs since i was out taking the pics. Amazing.
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#17 User is online   Dave W 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:51

The River Exe at Stoodleigh is 20cm now below ts highest ever level in over 50 years of records ..
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#18 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 21:57

Looking at the other gauges of the rivers that flooded in November really bad, they are no where near the levels of the Exe and Barle. I was tempted to go and have a look but unsure if i will or not. Can't really take photos in this darkness as my flashgun got into the hands of my 5yr old daughter and is no more.
Considering the amount of water the Barle is throwing at the Exe, the Exe is distributing it rather effectively.
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#19 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 22:05

River Exe has caused a landslip on the Tiverton to Bickleigh road. Bickleigh and Stoke Cannon totally flooded. Road closed.
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#20 User is offline   RichC 

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 22:15

Barle finally peaked at 2100 and dropping. Nearly went off the scale.
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